Arthur W. Frank: Socio-narratology Reads Philoctetes: Disability, Healing, and Ethics of Care

April 17, 2012
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Denney 311

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2012-04-17 16:00:00 2012-04-17 17:30:00 Arthur W. Frank: Socio-narratology Reads Philoctetes: Disability, Healing, and Ethics of Care The lecture offers an application of the ideas of socio-narratology, as proposed in Dr. Frank’s recent book, Letting Stories Breathe. Sophocles’s last play, Philoctetes, presents a period of crisis for a hero who is less ill than he is disabled. Philoctetes’ confrontation with the two characters who come to “save” him from his suffering makes the play useful as a “companion story” for people who need healing but confront uncertainties about what that actually means.Arthur W. Frank is professor of sociology at the University of Calgary. He is the author of a memoir of critical illness, At the Will of the Body (1991; new edition 2002); a study of first-person illness narratives, The Wounded Storyteller (1995); a book on care as dialogue, The Renewal of Generosity: Illness, Medicine and How to Live (2004); and most recently, a book on how stories affect our lives, Letting Stories Breathe: A Socio-narratology (2010).Dr. Frank has been visiting professor at the University of Sydney, Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, the University of Central Lancashire, and the University of Toronto, and a visiting fellow in bioethics at the University of Otago, New Zealand. For many years he was book review editor of the journal health: an interdisciplinary journal and among other editorial board appointments, he is a contributing editor to Literature and Medicine. Co-Sponsored by Project Narrative, Literacy Studies, and Disability Studies Denney 311 Project Narrative projectnarrative@osu.edu America/New_York public

The lecture offers an application of the ideas of socio-narratology, as proposed in Dr. Frank’s recent book, Letting Stories Breathe. Sophocles’s last play, Philoctetes, presents a period of crisis for a hero who is less ill than he is disabled. Philoctetes’ confrontation with the two characters who come to “save” him from his suffering makes the play useful as a “companion story” for people who need healing but confront uncertainties about what that actually means.

Arthur W. Frank is professor of sociology at the University of Calgary. He is the author of a memoir of critical illness, At the Will of the Body (1991; new edition 2002); a study of first-person illness narratives, The Wounded Storyteller (1995); a book on care as dialogue, The Renewal of Generosity: Illness, Medicine and How to Live (2004); and most recently, a book on how stories affect our lives, Letting Stories Breathe: A Socio-narratology (2010).

Dr. Frank has been visiting professor at the University of Sydney, Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, the University of Central Lancashire, and the University of Toronto, and a visiting fellow in bioethics at the University of Otago, New Zealand. For many years he was book review editor of the journal health: an interdisciplinary journal and among other editorial board appointments, he is a contributing editor to Literature and Medicine.
 
Co-Sponsored by Project Narrative, Literacy Studies, and Disability Studies